Skip to main content



Helen Hagar (1896-1984) Stencil Collection

Helen Hagar (1896-1984) Stencil Collection

1 of 2
Open Finding Aid

HELEN HAGAR (1896-1984) STENCIL COLLECTION, circa 1940-1981





Collection Summary

Repository:The Phillips Library at the Peabody Essex Museum 132 Essex Street Salem, MA 01970 Phone: 978-745-9500 Fax: 978-531-1516
Creator:Hagar, Helen, 1896-1984
Title:Helen Hagar (1896-1984) Stencil Collection
Dates:circa 1940/1981
Quantity:5.5 linear feet (6 boxes)
Abstract:The Helen Hagar Stencil Collection consists of artifacts related to and products of Helen Hagar's stenciling work.
Collection Number:MSS 89

Series List


Scope and Content Note

The Helen Hagar Stencil Collection consists of artifacts related to and products of Helen Hagar's stenciling work. Free-hand drawings and paintings, articles on decorating tin, or tole, ware cut from magazines, cloth and cardboard stencils, tracings, and a few letters to customers are included. The collection covers the period of about 1940 to 1981, with most of the work apparently being done during the late 1950s and the 1960s. Flowers, fruit, baskets, bowls, compotes, shells, lyres, swans, cows, and foliage were frequently used to decorate furniture, ceramics, tin, velvet bags, and boxes. Both old and modern objects were decorated by Hagar.


Biographical Sketch

Helen Clark Hagar was born on September 8, 1896 in Peabody, Massachusetts, the youngest child of William C. and Emma Florence Hagar. She graduated from Peabody High School in 1915. In the 1920s she attended the George Vesper School of Art, located in Boston. After her graduation, she moved to Salem to live with her mother and aunt and worked in the field restoring antique furniture and other works of art. She lived in Salem until her death in 1984.


Hagar studied, practiced, and taught stenciling and lectured on its history. She was employed first by the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities and then by the National Park Service to live in and conduct tours of the Derby House (178 Derby Street, Salem, MA). During this time she sold some of her works in a shop in the Derby House.


Hagar both restored antique household utensils and furnishings and painted new utensils (such as trays) to match the period. Christmas cards, fabrics, object d'art (such as painted ceramics), and the designs of early American stencillers served as sources of inspiration. She primarily used floral and leaf designs, as well as shells and baskets. Helen Hagar also decorated objects for specific people and occasions, such as a Christmas music book. Beverly High School was the site of her painting classes for adults.


Index Terms

This collection is indexed under the following headings in Philcat. Researchers desiring materials about related topics, persons, or places should search the catalog using these headings.

Hagar, Helen, 1896-1984
Artists
Furniture
Stencil work
Tinware
Tole painting
Tray painting
Women artists--United States
Salem (Mass.)

Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

This collection is open for research use.


Administrative Information

Copyright

Requests for permission to publish material from the collection must be submitted in writing to the Manuscript Librarian in the Phillips Library at the Peabody Essex Museum.

Preferred Citation

Helen Hagar (1896-1984) Stencil Collection, MSS 89, Phillips Library, Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Mass.

Provenance

The collection constitutes a reorganization of three loose-leaf notebooks, numerous envelopes, and loose papers. The collection was donated in June 1981 by Helen Hagar.

Processing Information

Collection processed by Anne A. Verplanck, August 1981. Updated by Tamara Gaydos, June 2017.


Related Material


Barthelemy, Nancy. "Other Women of Interest." The South Danvers Observer 4 (Spring 2010): 4. Published by the Peabody Institute Library.


Helen Hagar Pattern Collection, 1906-1979, Acc 2012.015.


you wish to report:


...
Select the collections to add or remove from your search
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
 
OK